Connect with us

Headlines

Floyd Mayweather offers to train Anthony Joshua for Oleksandr Usyk rematch

Published

on

Floyd Mayweather has again offered to train Anthony Joshua in a bid to help the Brit win back his world titles from Oleksandr Usyk.

Mayweather, one of the all-time boxing greats, claims that he reached out to Joshua while he was still undefeated, having spotted a few holes in his game.

Ultimately, the link-up never happened, although the pair are friends, with Mayweather having travelled during intensive coronavirus restrictions to attend his fight with Kubrat Pulev in London last year.

And the boxing great has once again offered to work with Joshua, after the Brit lost his world titles for a second time to Usyk in September.

“That was not an upset,” Mayweather told reporters in California when asked about the Joshua vs Usyk fight.

“When you’ve got two guys with so much experience, like I said before, it’s just that Anthony Joshua was on TV more so everybody had seen him.

“Usyk is a hell of a fighter, a gold medalist if I’m not mistaken, but he was behind the scenes.

“You had two guys with an amateur background, and one guy was not being seen while the other was, and we called it an upset – no, it’s just that Usyk was working behind the scenes while Joshua was in front of everybody.

Mayweather weighed in on Joshua’s recent trainer situation as well, with the Brit visiting a number of top coaches amid rumours of a split from Rob McCracken.

Joshua has said that he would like to bring in a big name trainer to work with McCracken, but could leave his long-time coach if it is deemed best for his career.

Advertisement

And the boxing legend believes that sticking with your coach from the amateurs, as Joshua has done with McCracken after being guided to an Olympic medal, may not always be the best move.

“I told him from the beginning, I came on the record from the beginning, I told him to come and I could teach him some pointers,” Mayweather said.

“A lot of the time, this is just my take, the same coach you had as an amateur doesn’t always make you a great professional.

“Some guys are great at amateur coaching and some guys are great at professional coaching, and even my dad was the best at professional.

Would you like to see Anthony Joshua work with Floyd Mayweather for the Usyk rematch? Let us know in the comments section!

“At the amateurs, he was teaching me like a professional, so I’m going to always speak real whether people like it or not.

“I feel like Anthony Joshua, they’re going to different coaches and saying ‘this coach is going to work with him’.

“But I told him at the beginning when he was undefeated ‘you’ve got some things you need to tweak because if you don’t then you may come up short’.”

Advertisement

Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Headlines

Return to the Ring: Mike Tyson and the big money fight against Jake Paul

Published

on

For some time now, Mike Tyson has been planning another return to the ring after taking on Roy Jones Jr in 2020. Until now, though, he hasn’t been able to nail down another opponent, even though several names have been mentioned, such as Evander Holyfield.

Now, Tyson could be in line to face Jake Paul in Las Vegas. From the moment the YouTuber brothers Jake and Logan Paul emerged into the boxing world, Tyson refrained from criticising them and now he could be rewarded with a mega money bout against the younger brother.

Advertisement

According to The Sun, the agents of both men are working on details for a Las Vegas fight that would take place at the end of 2022.

It is estimated that the prize money could reach 45 million dollars, just through PPV and ticket sales.

Tyson said on Monday that this fight “is news to me”, but The Sun insist that the details are being finalised and that we could see Jake Paul vs Mike Tyson before the end of the year.

Advertisement

Continue Reading

Headlines

Serious Conversation: Novak Djokovic controversy draws stern response from Victoria Azarenka at Australian Open

Published

on

NOVAK DJOKOVIC’S deportation from the Australian Open has sparked conversation about compulsory vaccinations in sport with Victoria Azarenka the latest to weigh in.

Grand Slam champion Victoria Azarenka has stated it is a “social responsibility” to get vaccinated and it should be compulsory. But the former world No.1 and WTA council member claimed there are legal reasons why the women’s professional tour cannot mandate every player to get jabbed. Novak Djokovic’s deportation after seeking to get a medical exemption has led to calls for all tournaments to insist every player is vaccinated.

Tennis fans back Australia decision to deport Novak Djokovic
But the Belarussian, who won the Australian Open title in 2012 and 2013, said: “From my standpoint it’s been very clear. I believe in science. I believe in getting vaccinated. That’s what I did for myself.

“However, we are playing a global sport, we still have to respect countries, different countries, different mandates, different legalities of the country.

“Some countries will not allow mandates. I think to impose something legally on the WTA Tour can be a challenge. I think that’s something that we are facing.

“I believe that spending a lot of extra money over this last almost two years now on all the testing, that is a big budget. I don’t necessarily will say that getting vaccinated, then nobody will be sick, but I think it is a step to hopefully battle against this coronavirus, hopefully bring it down globally. But to make it as a mandate, there is much more to it.

Advertisement

Victoria Azarenka has stated it is a “social responsibility” to get vaccinated
“In our case I think this is what has been recommended, and that’s what I believe is the right thing to do.

“I think from a social standpoint it’s been very clear that the WTA is supporting the vaccines and recommending it. Again, it goes beyond mandating for a legal part. Encouragement has always been from the WTA side, from tennis side I think in general.”

The world No.25, who reached the third round of the Australian Open with a 6-1 6-2 victory over Jil Teichmann, added: “On a social aspect, personally for me it’s not necessarily maybe about myself, it’s about other people. Like my parents for example, are at high risk for Covid.

“I had Covid in November of this year. Unfortunately my parents also got it. It was tough for my dad. Thankfully he was vaccinated because I honestly don’t know what could have happened otherwise. For me there is a social responsibility for other people who are much more vulnerable than us. I definitely look at it from that point, as well.”

Advertisement

Continue Reading

Headlines

Novak Djokovic may face five years in prison as Home Affairs investigate Covid test error

Published

on

By

AUSTRALIA’S Home Affairs department is now investigating Novak Djokovic over his breach of Covid isolation rules in Serbia and inconsistencies in his positive Covid test date.

 

 

Novak Djokovic looks to be in a losing battle over his Australian visa, as Australian immigration officials confirmed they would be investigating multiple discrepancies over the world No 1’s Covid test, travel documents and isolation breaches. Djokovic admitted on Wednesday that he had broken isolation rules in Serbia after testing positive last month.

Djokovic had his visa cancelled when arriving in Melbourne for the Australian Open last week after providing border officials with “minimal” proof of a medical exemption he was granted by Tennis Australia.

The nine-time Aussie Open champion appealed the decision and won on the grounds of “procedural fairness” after the federal government conceded they had not given Djokovic enough time to provide more proof or contact Tennis Australia.

While the Serb has been allowed freely into Melbourne, Immigration Minister Alex Hawke is continuing to consider whether to cancel Djokovic’s visa for a second time on the basis that the reason for the No 1’s medical exemption – prior Covid infection in the last six months – is not a valid vaccine exemption for foreign nationals entering Australia.

The Department of Home Affairs is also separately investigating Djokovic, and it has now been confirmed that their probe has been widened to include his breach of Covid isolation rules in Serbia, inconsistencies on the date he claims he received his positive test result, and incorrect statements on his Australian Travel Declaration form, according to The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.

During the 20-time Major champion’s appeal hearing, a sworn court affidavit confirmed he was both “tested and diagnosed” on December 16, taking a PCR test earlier in the day and receiving notification of a positive result at around 8pm Serbian time.

It then surfaced that Djokovic had attended a children’s tennis event in Serbia on December 17, presenting awards while not wearing a mask, and took part in an interview with L’Equipe on December 18.

On Wednesday, the Serb released a statement claiming he only received notification of his positive test result after the children’s event on December 17, but admitted to breaking isolation rules by attending the interview on December 18 knowingly having Covid – a breach of Serbian isolation requirements…

Home Affairs will now consider both the contradictions in the date of Djokovic’s positive test result, and his decision to break Serbian Covid isolation rules as part of their probe.

Advertisement

If he is found to have given false evidence in regards to his Covid test he could face serious consequences, with a prison sentence of five years the maximum penalty giving false evidence under the Crimes Act.

As well as the inconsistencies surrounding the date, the Home Affairs department is probing new questions over whether the positive result was manipulated.

It was also reported on Tuesday that the Australian government were investigating whether the world No 1 lied on his declaration form when entering the country last week, as he claimed he had not travelled in the 14 days prior to arriving in Melbourne when he had gone from his home of Serbia to Spain in this period.

Djokovic was not believed to have filled in the form himself, instead having someone do it on his behalf, and in his statement on Tuesday he confirmed that his support team submitted the form on his behalf, and the incorrect information about his previous travel had been “human error”.

“On the issue of my travel declaration, this was submitted by my support team on my behalf – as I told immigration officials on my arrival – and my agent sincerely apologises for the administrative mistake in ticking the incorrect box about my previous travel before coming to Australia,” he said.

On the form, all travellers are asked whether they have “travelled or will travel in the 14 days prior to your flight to Australia”.

They are also warned that “giving false or misleading information is a serious offence. You may also be liable to a civil penalty for giving false or misleading information”, with a maximum penalty of 12 months imprisonment.

Meanwhile, the Immigration Minister’s decision on whether to revoke Djokovic’s visa for a second time will continue to drag on, after a spokesperson for Mr Hawke confirmed on Wednesday that the world No 1’s lawyers had “recently provided lengthy further submissions and supporting documentation said to be relevant to the possible cancellation of Mr Djokovic’s visa”, and said: “Naturally, this will affect the timeframe for a decision.”

While the Immigration Minister’s decision is independent, he can also consider whether to cancel Djokovic’s visa on the grounds of his character, informed by the ongoing Home Affairs investigation.

Advertisement

Continue Reading

Adevert




Copyright © 2021 World Celeb Zone. All rights reserved.