Connect with us

Headlines

Roger Federer, Nadal, Djokovic and the secret of victory

Published

on

Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic and the secret of victory. Or rather, the refusal of accepting defeat. The desire to never give up, in the face of negative seasons, injuries and extra-sporting problems.

 

 

The secrets of victory studied scientifically: what leads a person to be a winner, in sport as in life? What distinguishes a winner from an ordinary person? In sports, specifically in tennis, whoever wins has a gift that ordinary mortals do not have.

Of the physical, technical, tactical, mental qualities (and, why not, also luck) that their opponents do not have. It cannot just be a coincidence that Federer, Djokovic, Nadal or Serena Williams have dominated tennis in such a brutal way for almost fifteen years, eliminating almost their rivals.

So this could be the first answer to our question. But of course, there is more. In this world, there are many other sportsmen who may have Federer or Lionel Messi’s class, the mental strength of Nadal, Djokovic or Lewis Hamilton or the athleticism of Cristiano Ronaldo.

Many athletes are talented, but the talent is not enough. To detonate talent also requires an undoubted mental strength: measure anger, fear and insecurity and discipline the mind, winning the war against all these anxieties and fears.

Many scientists are analyzing and studying interconnections between the concept of victory and brain chemistry. For years, scientists thought that dominance depended solely on testosterone: the more you have it, the more you can dominate, as in sports and everyday life.

Here is a scientific explanation of the strength of Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic

By winning you have an injection of testosterone, which will help you win the next phase, triggering a circle. Yet some researchers from the universities of Texas and Columbia found that testosterone is only useful when it is regulated by small units of another hormone, cortisol.

Advertisement

For those with a lot of cortisol in their blood, having a high testosterone level can be an impediment to victory. According to Professor Paul Ingram, the ideal leader is calm but is distinguished by a strong drive for dominance.

And this applies to both men and women. Mental psychology is also another catalyst that triggers another virtuous circle: winning helps to win. What’s better than a win to get more wins? Awareness of one’s own means and abilities, if disciplined in the correct way, can be an even greater push, which increases the chances of being a winner.

Victory for happiness: according to Scott Huttel, director of the Center of neuroeconomic Studies at Duke University, whoever wins the gold medal is the happiest in an Olympic race. The second happiest is the bronze medal winner.

This underlines how the second classified suffers from the defeat and is, therefore, more unhappy than the third classified. Whoever wins and the silver medal only thinks of the mistakes that prevented him from winning the gold medal.

In short, the balance that transforms a human being into a winner is achieved through different steps and different moments: understanding the secrets of Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic and Serena Williams would already be a victory in itself.

Advertisement

Entertainment

Martina Navratilova compares Naomi Osaka to Serena Williams

Published

on

Former world No. 1 Martina Navratilova suggested Naomi Osaka is all about business as she is focused on making it all the way on the biggest stage.

 

 

Osaka, 24, has seven titles in her collection and four of those seven titles came at the Grand Slam level.

“Naomi [Osaka] dominated the majors, particularly the hard courts, but never the little tournaments,” Navratilova told the WTA, as quoted on Tennishead. “Kind of like Serena. I think to leave your mark on the game, you need to dominate all the events, a la Barty, a la Djokovic.

“They concentrate on majors, but you can’t just use the other tournaments as warmups”.

Navratilova thinks Osaka needs to play more
Osaka took a two-month break from tennis after the French Open and she also didn’t play any events in 2021 after the US Open.

“The less you play, the more the pressure builds up and the less feel you have for the game itself,” Navratilova explained. “You need to put in the reps. If [Naomi Osaka] can do that, she has the game to blow anybody off the court because she’s quick, moves well and is strong on both wings.

Advertisement

“And she’s got the massive serve as well. She just needs to play more matches”. Recentl, Osaka opened up about losing the joy for the game. “I started to feel like that power was being taken away from me,” Osaka explained.

“I wasn’t playing to make myself happy and I was more concerned about what would people say about me. “I used to love the competition and just being competitive. Like if I were to play a long match, the longer it was the more fun it was for me.

“And then I just started to feel – recently – the longer it was the more stressed out I became. But I just needed a break to go within myself.”

Advertisement

Continue Reading

Headlines

Happy Memories – Maria Sharapova: “When I won Wimbledon my mother was …”

Published

on

The last tournament officially played by Maria Sharapova was that of the Australian Open, 2020 edition: out of the top 150 players in the world, the Russian lost in the first round against Croatian Donna Vekic,for 6-3 6-4.

A few days earlier she had also gone out in the first game in Brisbane, this time against Jennifer Brady. Maria triumphed in Melbourne in 2008, winning the final over Ana Ivanovic. Speaking on the Second Life podcast, the beautiful Russian recalled a funny episode that took place more than sixteen years ago, on the occasion of her first and only triumph on the grass of Church Road, when she was still a teenager.

The memory of Maria Sharapova
At that edition of Wimbledon, 17-years-old Sharapova already occupied the 17th seed and was only her second participation in the British Major. Maria quite easily overtook Yuliya Beygelzimer, Anne Keothavong, Daniela Hantuchova and Amy Frazier, qualifying for the quarter-finals.

Here she defeated Ai Sugiyama in a comeback, as did Lindsay Davenport in the next round. In the final, she surpassed the American Serena Williams, holder of the title, with a score of 6-1 6-4. She said: “I remember my mother, at that time, was actually on a plane flight.

It was that time when small televisions on planes started to appear, my mother had one on. He saw me win at a height of 30,000 feet. Then I ran to the court and reached my bag, hugged my father and started to take my cell phone and call my mother, forgetting that it was still flying.”

Advertisement

The Russian will return to the final at Wimbledon one last time in 2011, but losing to Czech Petra Kvitova. Maria also boasts a silver medal at the London 2012 Olympics, when she was defeated in the last game by Serena Williams with a clear score of 6-0 6-1.

Unfortunately, the Church Road event was not held this year due to the Covid emergency. Interviewed recently, the former 5-times-Slam-champion answered the question of whether she had picked up the racket again recently, she said: “In the last couple of months I haven’t done it, because I stayed home.

But of course I’ll do it when things calm down a little and there is more flexibility. Tennis is a sport that I love very much and I will certainly be back on the court soon.” Maria said she was aware that the sensations will not be the same as before, since she is no longer a professional tennis player: “It will be a bit strange and bizarre, but that’s okay.

I’ve always been a person who accepts a feeling or a feeling even when I don’t know it completely or don’t feel great, I like to find a solution. So I will also address this feeling when I try it.”

Advertisement

Continue Reading

Entertainment

Why Jennifer Aniston and Justin Theroux’s two-year marriage ended

Published

on

Hollywood actress Jennifer Aniston and Justin Theroux went from co-stars to husband and wife and built a wonderful life together in Bel Air. Sadly, the couple got divorced in 2018 and have since spoken out about the tragic split. Here’s everything you need to know about their relationship…

How did Jennifer Aniston and Justin Theroux meet?
Justin and Jennifer met through Ben Stiller in 2007, as Justin co-wrote the film Tropic Thunder with Ben, and Jennifer and Ben are long-time friends. But then in 2011, they also starred in the film Wanderlust together, which is where the romance really blossomed.

When did Jennifer Aniston and Justin Theroux get engaged?
The couple got engaged in August 2012, when Justin popped the question on her 41st birthday while they were in New York. Jennifer’s ring was a huge oval diamond with a delicate golden band – a rock that was very hard to miss!

When did Jennifer Aniston and Justin Theroux get married?
It was three years after the engagement, in August 2015, when the couple finally tied the knot. They chose to have their ceremony at their home in Bel Air, telling guests it was a birthday party and surprising them all with the nuptials.

Advertisement

When did Jennifer Aniston and Justin Theroux get divorced?
It was February 2018 when the couple called it quits and announced their divorce to the world. The rumour mill went into overdrive, but as their joint statement explains, the split was amicable. It read: “We have decided to announce our separation. This decision was mutual and lovingly made at the end of last year. We are two best friends who have decided to part ways as a couple, but look forward to continuing our cherished friendship.”

In a recent interview with Esquire, Justin finally quashed rumours that his desire to live in New York while Jennifer wanted to remain in LA was a factor in their break-up, saying: “That’s a narrative that is not true, for the most part.”

Advertisement

Continue Reading

Adevert




Copyright © 2021 World Celeb Zone. All rights reserved.