Connect with us

Headlines

The nuclear megayacht designed to save the world–see photos

Published

on

The ultimate symbol of wealth, the superyacht has seen a dramatic surge in demand during the pandemic, as the ultra-rich yearned for privacy and social distancing in its most luxurious, exclusive form.
Orders flowed in, adding to a rising global fleet of thousands of superyachts — loosely defined as luxury boats at least 24 metres in length and professionally crewed.
Large superyachts have a disproportionately negative impact on the planet.

 

 

According to one calculation by Indiana University anthropologists, one with a permanent crew, a helicopter pad, submarines and pools emits over 7000 tonnes of CO2 a year.
Multiplied by 300, roughly the number of superyachts worldwide that fit that bill, that equals over two million tons of CO2, more than the individual yearly emissions of about a quarter of the world’s countries.

 

 

Now, a proposed ship aims to leverage the superyacht’s aura of luxury and merge it with scientific research to create an emissions-free megaship that will pit together climate scientists and the wealthy in a daring quest to save the planet.

 

“Why not take the wealthiest people in the world, pull them together with the smartest and brightest scientists, and allow them to experience firsthand what’s taking place?” asks Aaron Olivera, the Gibraltar-born, Singapore-based entrepreneur behind the idea.
“Wealthy people can go online and buy anything they want, but they cannot buy a new mental model with which to see the world.”

 

A floating computer
If built, the new vessel, to be christened Earth 300 in reference to its length of 300 metres, would dwarf even the world’s largest superyacht; the 180-metre long Azzam, owned by the Abu Dhabi royal family.
The preliminary design is sleek and bold, with a unique 13-storey sphere that will house two dozen scientific laboratories. They will gather data from the ship’s travels to hopefully come up with solutions to help mitigate the climate crisis.

If built, the new vessel would dwarf even the world’s largest superyacht.
If built, the new vessel would dwarf even the world’s largest superyacht. (Courtesy Earth 300)
Feeding into an open-source platform to allow the global community to participate, they will be supported by a quantum computer, a new type of computer that employs the properties of quantum mechanics to achieve incredible speed and power.

 

Like much of the technology that Mr Olivera hopes to incorporate into Earth 300, the quantum computer is not yet commercially available, but is currently the subject of experimental studies by the likes of Google and IBM.
Most of the ship’s capacity of 425 people will be taken up by two main groups: 165 crew and 160 scientists.
There will also be 20 students and a pool of 20 resident experts — economists, engineers, explorers, artists, activists and politicians — forming a “multidisciplinary melting pot,” says Mr Olivera.

 

The only paying guests will be the wealthy tourists occupying the ship’s 20 VIP suites, at a projected cost of just over US$1.38 million per person, to fund the science.
But forget about ‘exclusivity’.
This ship will be a floating computer which will allow people from all around the world to participate in the journey. That means that these wealthy individuals who are coming on board will have to share the experience with the world, not just among themselves,” says Mr Olivera.
A global vessel

 

Mr Olivera says he envisages Earth 300 to become an iconic object of its generation, and draws comparisons to the Olympic torch and the Eiffel tower.

“The reason we’re building a ship is that climate change is a global problem, so it needs a global vehicle,” he says, adding that the oceans are the beating heart of the planet, because they absorb most of the carbon.
READ MORE: ‘Mad Max’ superyacht concept powered by airplane jet engines
The Earth 300 is designed to be an emissions-free vessel.

Advertisement

 

The Earth 300 is designed to be an emissions-free vessel. (Courtesy Earth 300)
But he also wanted people to come together in a confined environment, experiencing some sense of adventure and even danger.
“Bonds that are made on a ship are very different from the ones that are made in a static building. When’s the last time you had an adventure inside a building?”Mr Olivera, who has a background in the world of luxury and hospitality in Singapore, says, explaining the inspiration for Earth 300 came when he was diving in the Maldives and saw its dying corals.
He envisages the ship as a way of combining two colliding worlds — luxury and environmentalism.
“We want to create a new brand of enlightened explorer, to turn the tide on the way people see the wealthy and show that they can, and should, be leading the way,” he says.

 

The idea of a luxury research vessel isn’t entirely new. REV Ocean, a similar project hailing from Norway, is a 182-metre long, US$484 million superyacht designed to investigate overfishing, climate change and plastic pollution.
Funded by fishing and oil drilling magnate Kjell Inge Røkke, it was supposed to set off in 2022, but the project has been delayed by three to five years due to problems with construction of the ship.

 

At US$967 million, Earth 300’s projected cost is double that of REV Ocean, and Mr Olivera is looking at shipyards in Germany and South Korea for the construction.
He says the ship’s preliminary design and naval engineering have been completed, and hopes to be ready for a maiden voyage this decade.

 

“I think 2025 is possible for us. It’s just a question of the chips falling into place in the next six months or so, once we have the funding package in place,” he says, adding that funding will come from private investors as well as “traditional banking instruments.”

 

Nuclear powered?
Initially, the ship will use green synthetic fuels, but to satisfy the requirement of being completely emission-free, Mr Olivera plans to eventually retrofit a molten-salt reactor, a modern type of nuclear reactor.
It would allow the ship to remain at sea indefinitely, with complete energy autonomy.
Designer Aaron Olivera says he hopes to power the vessel using experimental nuclear technology.
Designer Aaron Olivera says he hopes to power the vessel using experimental nuclear technology. (Courtesy Earth 300)
Just like the quantum computer, however, this technology doesn’t exist yet, but it’s being developed by UK firm Core Power in collaboration with TerraPower, a nuclear engineering company chaired by Bill Gates.
It’s one of a dozen entities that have announced ties with the project, including IBM, naval architecture studio Iddes Yachts and ship classification firm RINA.

 

 

When asked which famous people he’d like to have on board, Mr Olivera responds with a list of names he calls “the usual suspects:” Elon Musk, Michelle Obama, Greta Thunberg, “No Logo” author Naomi Klein and Patagonia clothing brand founder Yvon Chouinard.

 

 

His plan, however, is to pair these VIPs with a set of non-famous “Very Inspiring People” from all walks of life, all ages and all cultures, who would not be asked to pay for their ticket, but would still get to stay in one of the luxury suites.”
That’s the way we are democratising the experience,” he says, “by allowing people who could never in a million years afford the ticket to come on board.”

Advertisement

Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Entertainment

Martina Navratilova compares Naomi Osaka to Serena Williams

Published

on

Former world No. 1 Martina Navratilova suggested Naomi Osaka is all about business as she is focused on making it all the way on the biggest stage.

 

 

Osaka, 24, has seven titles in her collection and four of those seven titles came at the Grand Slam level.

“Naomi [Osaka] dominated the majors, particularly the hard courts, but never the little tournaments,” Navratilova told the WTA, as quoted on Tennishead. “Kind of like Serena. I think to leave your mark on the game, you need to dominate all the events, a la Barty, a la Djokovic.

“They concentrate on majors, but you can’t just use the other tournaments as warmups”.

Navratilova thinks Osaka needs to play more
Osaka took a two-month break from tennis after the French Open and she also didn’t play any events in 2021 after the US Open.

“The less you play, the more the pressure builds up and the less feel you have for the game itself,” Navratilova explained. “You need to put in the reps. If [Naomi Osaka] can do that, she has the game to blow anybody off the court because she’s quick, moves well and is strong on both wings.

Advertisement

“And she’s got the massive serve as well. She just needs to play more matches”. Recentl, Osaka opened up about losing the joy for the game. “I started to feel like that power was being taken away from me,” Osaka explained.

“I wasn’t playing to make myself happy and I was more concerned about what would people say about me. “I used to love the competition and just being competitive. Like if I were to play a long match, the longer it was the more fun it was for me.

“And then I just started to feel – recently – the longer it was the more stressed out I became. But I just needed a break to go within myself.”

Advertisement

Continue Reading

Headlines

Happy Memories – Maria Sharapova: “When I won Wimbledon my mother was …”

Published

on

The last tournament officially played by Maria Sharapova was that of the Australian Open, 2020 edition: out of the top 150 players in the world, the Russian lost in the first round against Croatian Donna Vekic,for 6-3 6-4.

A few days earlier she had also gone out in the first game in Brisbane, this time against Jennifer Brady. Maria triumphed in Melbourne in 2008, winning the final over Ana Ivanovic. Speaking on the Second Life podcast, the beautiful Russian recalled a funny episode that took place more than sixteen years ago, on the occasion of her first and only triumph on the grass of Church Road, when she was still a teenager.

The memory of Maria Sharapova
At that edition of Wimbledon, 17-years-old Sharapova already occupied the 17th seed and was only her second participation in the British Major. Maria quite easily overtook Yuliya Beygelzimer, Anne Keothavong, Daniela Hantuchova and Amy Frazier, qualifying for the quarter-finals.

Here she defeated Ai Sugiyama in a comeback, as did Lindsay Davenport in the next round. In the final, she surpassed the American Serena Williams, holder of the title, with a score of 6-1 6-4. She said: “I remember my mother, at that time, was actually on a plane flight.

It was that time when small televisions on planes started to appear, my mother had one on. He saw me win at a height of 30,000 feet. Then I ran to the court and reached my bag, hugged my father and started to take my cell phone and call my mother, forgetting that it was still flying.”

Advertisement

The Russian will return to the final at Wimbledon one last time in 2011, but losing to Czech Petra Kvitova. Maria also boasts a silver medal at the London 2012 Olympics, when she was defeated in the last game by Serena Williams with a clear score of 6-0 6-1.

Unfortunately, the Church Road event was not held this year due to the Covid emergency. Interviewed recently, the former 5-times-Slam-champion answered the question of whether she had picked up the racket again recently, she said: “In the last couple of months I haven’t done it, because I stayed home.

But of course I’ll do it when things calm down a little and there is more flexibility. Tennis is a sport that I love very much and I will certainly be back on the court soon.” Maria said she was aware that the sensations will not be the same as before, since she is no longer a professional tennis player: “It will be a bit strange and bizarre, but that’s okay.

I’ve always been a person who accepts a feeling or a feeling even when I don’t know it completely or don’t feel great, I like to find a solution. So I will also address this feeling when I try it.”

Advertisement

Continue Reading

Entertainment

Why Jennifer Aniston and Justin Theroux’s two-year marriage ended

Published

on

Hollywood actress Jennifer Aniston and Justin Theroux went from co-stars to husband and wife and built a wonderful life together in Bel Air. Sadly, the couple got divorced in 2018 and have since spoken out about the tragic split. Here’s everything you need to know about their relationship…

How did Jennifer Aniston and Justin Theroux meet?
Justin and Jennifer met through Ben Stiller in 2007, as Justin co-wrote the film Tropic Thunder with Ben, and Jennifer and Ben are long-time friends. But then in 2011, they also starred in the film Wanderlust together, which is where the romance really blossomed.

When did Jennifer Aniston and Justin Theroux get engaged?
The couple got engaged in August 2012, when Justin popped the question on her 41st birthday while they were in New York. Jennifer’s ring was a huge oval diamond with a delicate golden band – a rock that was very hard to miss!

When did Jennifer Aniston and Justin Theroux get married?
It was three years after the engagement, in August 2015, when the couple finally tied the knot. They chose to have their ceremony at their home in Bel Air, telling guests it was a birthday party and surprising them all with the nuptials.

Advertisement

When did Jennifer Aniston and Justin Theroux get divorced?
It was February 2018 when the couple called it quits and announced their divorce to the world. The rumour mill went into overdrive, but as their joint statement explains, the split was amicable. It read: “We have decided to announce our separation. This decision was mutual and lovingly made at the end of last year. We are two best friends who have decided to part ways as a couple, but look forward to continuing our cherished friendship.”

In a recent interview with Esquire, Justin finally quashed rumours that his desire to live in New York while Jennifer wanted to remain in LA was a factor in their break-up, saying: “That’s a narrative that is not true, for the most part.”

Advertisement

Continue Reading

Adevert




Copyright © 2021 World Celeb Zone. All rights reserved.